5 Questions To Ask Your Child’s Special Education Teacher

Schools for students with learning disabilities, such as private autism schools, provide a nurturing environment for your child to learn and grow. With 96% of parents believing that children can overcome learning disabilities through proper instruction, special education teachers are striving to meet this expectation. By opening communication lines with your child’s teacher, you can be a participant in your child’s road to success. Once you enroll your child in a special needs education program, be sure to ask their teacher these questions.

What needs to be included in my child’s IEP?
As the teacher is writing your child’s Individualized Education Plan, be sure to speak with them about what they are emphasizing. The two of you can work together to make sure that your child’s independent needs are met, as you each are involved in their life in different areas. This collaboration will bring different perspectives to the conversation.

Are there any areas where my child is struggling?
Your child’s successes and difficulties will likely change constantly, so be sure to ask the teacher for updates. They will be able to fill you in about where your child is falling behind. This could change what extra practice and services your are planning.

How can I best communicate with my child about their learning disability?
This can be a tricky topic to address with your child. Talk with their teacher about how to emphasize their successes while still explaining why certain subjects may be difficult for them.

How often should we meet?
This initial conversation is a great time to open up communication lines in the future. Set up a meeting schedule in the future so you can keep up with your child’s changing needs and behavior.

What can I do at home to help my child learn?
While schools for students with learning disabilities are created to help your child succeed, what happens at home is also a significant contributor. Ask the teacher what routines you and your child can set up to supplement what they are learning in school.